STUDENT LIFE

Downtown Toronto

 

The Downtown core is the economic powerhouse of Toronto, although it lacks the cultural appeal of the outlying districts. Many of Toronto's larger attractions are located here, however, so it's an essential part of any visit to Toronto.

Dozens of towering glass, concrete and steel monoliths are a must-see for architecture enthusiasts. Toronto's Financial District is actually quite compact and walkable, even in inclement weather. That's because of the "PATH" [12] - 27 km (16 miles) of interconnecting passageways under the streets that feature more than 1,200 stores and services. Street entrances to the subterranean walkway are indicated with "PATH" signage.

Niagara Falls

 

Niagara Falls was incorporated on June 12, 1903. Its population is 82,998 as of 2011. Niagara Falls is also considered by some to be one of the most romantic places in the world.

Mainly a tourist destination, the main attraction has always been Niagara Falls, which brings hundreds of thousands of tourists to the city. Now tourism plays a major part in the economy of the region. Increasingly, visitors seeking more natural settings are finding the Niagara River to be a great place to hike and visit downstream from the Falls where the majority of visitors go.

Visitor Welcome Centers open daily at 9AM, June through August. They offer advice and maps of the area, and sell WEGO bus tickets and the Great Gorge Adventure Pass.

Blue Mountains

 

Blue Mountain is an alpine ski resort in OntarioCanada, just northwest of Collingwood. It is situated on a section of the Niagara Escarpment about 1 km (0.6 mi.) from Nottawasaga Bay, and is a major destination for skiers from southern Ontario. On average, Blue Mountain sells more than 750,000 lift tickets per year, making it the third-busiest ski resort in Canada, after Whistler-Blackcomb in British Columbia and Mont Tremblant in Quebec.

 

 It is one of the largest resorts in Ontario and has been extensively built out, featuring 42 runs, 16 chairlifts and 3 freestyle terrains. Majority-owned by Intrawest since 1999, the resort has recently undergone major renovations, including new high-speed lifts and a new "village" similar to those built at Tremblant and Whistler at its base.

Ottawa

 

Ottawa (/ˈɒtəwə/ ( listen) or /-wɑː/; French pronunciation: ​[ɔtawa]) is the capital city of Canada. It stands on the south bank of the Ottawa River in the eastern portion of southern Ontario.

 

Ottawa borders GatineauQuebec; the two form the core of the Ottawa–Gatineau census metropolitan area (CMA) and the National Capital Region (NCR).[12] As of 2016, Ottawa had a city population of 934,243 and a metropolitan population of 1,323,783 making it the fourth-largest city and the fifth-largest CMA in Canada.

Montreal

 

Montreal [40] (French: Montréal) is the metropolis of the province of Quebec. Quebec City is the political capital but Montreal is the cultural and economic capital of Quebec and the main entry point to the province. The second largest city in Canada, it is a city rich in culture and history and a well-deserved reputation as one of the liveliest cities in North America.

 

Montreal is the second-largest French-speaking (as a mother language) city in the world, behind Paris. The population of Montreal is about 1.9 million, with 4 million in the metro area. Montreal is sometimes referred to as The Paris of Canada.

Algonquin Provincial Park

 

Algonquin Park was formed in 1893. Its original primary purpose was as a timber reserve designed to keep forest-clearing settlers out of valuable timber lands. Preservation was only a secondary purpose. In 1896, lumber baron J.R. Booth completed the Ottawa, Arnpriror & Parry Sound railway (OA & PS) through the southern portion of the park.

 

Though designed to haul timber logs out of the park, it allowed the vast expanse of Algonquin to be opened up for tourism. Highway 60 was completed in 1933, further opening the Park to visitors. The OA & PS railway was abandoned in 1947; logging was now becoming a tertiary purpose of the park.

Vancouver City​

 

Vancouver (/vænˈkuːvər/ ( listen), locally usually [væŋ-][4]) is a coastal seaport city in Canada, located in the Lower Mainland region of British Columbia. As the most populous city in the province, the 2016 census recorded 631,486 people in the city, up from 603,502 in 2011. The Greater Vancouver area had a population of 2,463,431 in 2016, making it the third-largest metropolitan area in Canada.

 

Vancouver has the highest population density in Canada with over 5,400 people per square kilometre,[5][6] which makes it the fourth-most densely populated city with over 250,000 residents in North America behind New York CitySan Francisco,[7] and Mexico City according to the 2011 census. Vancouver is one of the most ethnically and linguistically diverse cities in Canada according to that census; 52% of its residents have a first language other than English.[8][9] Vancouver is classed as a Beta global city.

Victoria Island

 

Victoria Island (or Kitlineq)[2][3] is a large island in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago that straddles the boundary between Nunavut and the Northwest Territories of Canada. It is the eighth largest island in the world, and at 217,291 km2(83,897 sq mi)1 in area, it is Canada's second largest island.

 

It is nearly double the size of Newfoundland (111,390 km2), and is slightly larger than the island of Great Britain (209,331 km2 (80,823 sq mi)). It contains the world's largest island within an island within an island.[4] The western third of the island belongs to the Inuvik Region in the Northwest Territories; the remainder is part of Nunavut's Kitikmeot Region.

Banff Provincial Park

 

The Downtown core is the economic powerhouse of Toronto, although it lacks the cultural appeal of the outlying districts. Many of Toronto's larger attractions are located here, however, so it's an essential part of any visit to Toronto.

Dozens of towering glass, concrete and steel monoliths are a must-see for architecture enthusiasts. Toronto's Financial District is actually quite compact and walkable, even in inclement weather. That's because of the "PATH" [12] - 27 km (16 miles) of interconnecting passageways under the streets that feature more than 1,200 stores and services. Street entrances to the subterranean walkway are indicated with "PATH" signage.

DESIGNED LEARNING INSTITUTE NUMBERS

TORONTO: # O212206178197

VANCOUVER: # O19352161652

BOARD SCHOOL IDENTIFICATION NUMBER:

BSID# 666564

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